Times in Washington D.C.

I just realized I never posted the photos from my trip to Washington D.C. on this blog o’ mine!

In the middle of January, I hopped on a bus and traveled to D.C. to see my favorite nerds, who I went on a cross-country road trip with this past spring. My bff Sean lives there, and my other bff Dana flew in from Cali. It was literally two weeks of us enjoying each other’s company, but I made a lot of pictures.

We went to a lot of the Smithsonian Museums (because knowledge is power!) and went to some historic sights. The last time I went to D.C., I was in middle school and I was a little punk who didn’t know the Charters of Freedom were in the National Archives.

Embarrassing side-note: My friends and I went looking in the Museum of Natural History for the Declaration of Independence. I’m still disappointed in myself.

One of the most interesting aspects of the trip was seeing everything being set-up for the presidential inauguration. Barring how depressing it was going to be, I was still geeked to see the clash of classical monuments with modern day technology. It’s so funny to see the background work of the pomp and circumstance.

We also took a trip out to Arlington National Cemetery and Gettysburg.

While in Gettysburg, I visited the site of Alexander Gardner’s famous “Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter” photograph. I hunted around for the Devil’s Den for a long while, and when I finally found it, the lighting was awful, and I had to wait a solid 45 minutes for a cloud to cover up the sun. I was determined because DANGIT I HAD BEEN LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS AND GROSS HARSH SHADOWS WERE NOT GOING TO RUIN THIS FOR ME.

The famous photograph:

Image result for home of rebel sharpshooter

I got to see my besties, saw some historical things, created a photo series making fun of the future president… Good times all around.

Happy Shooting!

 

Photographer of the Day: Alexander Gardner

Alexander Gardner

b. 1821, d. 1882

Today, we talk about a legend from the American Civil War period. Gardner was one of the early photographers who made people question photographic “truth”, as the photographs he took of the civil war appear to be staged– because, well, they kinda had to be. Gardner’s process was wet-plate, which was kind of hard to execute (ouch, that pun,) on an active battle field. U feel me?

This image is the one most associated with his work:

Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter was one of many photographs featured in Gardner’s Photographic Sketchbook of the Civil War, which was presented in two volumes. It is believed that Gardner and his assistants moved the body to this position and propped up the weapon, as a sign of his profession. Talk about morbid. Speaking of morbid: you could get this guy as a stereo image back in the day, y’know, for a realistic 3D viewing of a dead guy while sitting in your parlor room.

Even more morbid: I went to Gettysburg on a middle school trip, and one of my friends laid on the ground, just like the subject of Gardner’s image. Without knowing anything about it, I also posed like I was dead. I’ll have to find the photo of this, uh, charming occurrence, because it is a classic example of why I may¬† scare small children from time to time.

Gardner is closely associated with the photographer Mathew Brady, who actually inspired Gardner to become a photographer. After listening to Brady’s idea to photograph the war (Brady was blind at this point in his life,) Gardner used some connections to become the chief photographer under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Topographical Engineers. He was given the honorary title of captain and he shot (I laughed at this terrible pun,) many important battles of the Civil War, including the Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Gettysburg, and the Siege of Petersburg. A lot of ‘burgs.

Shout out to field photographers who work in dangerous times.

That’s all for my crash course on Alexander Gardner. The next PotD will be a photographer who I just recently learned about, Robert Heinecken. And no, he has nothing to do with the beer.

Happy Shooting (that pun again…)